Telephone Issues

Please be advised that our phone system is having technical difficulties and we are unable to receive voicemails at this time.

The best time to contact the office by phone is during normal opening hours (Monday-Friday from 10:30-3:30) when someone will be here to answer.  Otherwise, we encourage you to send queries by using either the contact form on the website or by email at admin@stbartholomews.ie.

We apologise for the inconvenience.

No Evensong this Sunday, 31 March

Our own Fr. Andrew has been promoted as a canon of Christ Church Cathedral!  As such, there will not be a Choral Evensong at Saint Bartholomew’s this Sunday, 31 March.  You are instead invited to join Fr. Andrew at his installation as canon at Christ Church Cathedral’s 3.30pm Choral Evensong (by the way, don’t worry—he’s not leaving Saint Bart’s!).

Compline this Wednesday

This Wednesday at 8.00pm, Saint Bartholomew’s will host Compline with a short reflection as part of the Rural Deanery of St. Ann’s Lenten services.

This is an opportunity to pray together as a rural deanery.  All are invited to join this short and reflective service, which lasts approximately half an hour and will be followed by refreshments.

Gaudete Singers Concert: Saturday, 9 March

The Gaudete Singers return to Saint Bartholomew’s this Saturday for a concert of beautiful nineteenth century Romantic sounds from the German and Austrian traditions.

Tickets on the door: €20; concession €15; students €5 with ID, all including a glass of wine or soft drink afterwards.

Mendelssohn is often considered the greatest child prodigy after Mozart. He began taking piano lessons from his mother when he was six years old.  At age eight, he studied composition with Carl Friedrich Zelter in Berlin and probably made his first public concert appearance at the age of nine. He was also a prolific composer as a child, and wrote his first published work, a piano quartet, by the time he was 13.

“His exposure to Bach led to a fondness for learned counterpoint as well as to his conducting the St. Matthew Passion in 1829 – an immensely influential performance that took Bach out of the exclusive hands of specialists and into a more general public consciousness. He began to perform throughout Europe as a conductor and as a pianist to great success. In 1829, he made his first trip to England where his composing and playing found a rapturous audience. Indeed, one can say that Mendelssohn dominated English music in the 19th century as completely as Handel had done in the 18th.” —Steven Schwartz

The influence of Bach can be heard in the two works in this concert that were written near the end of his short life. The Drei Psalmen were composed in 1843/4 and Die Deutsche Liturgie in 1846. Both works were composed for church services in Berlin Cathedral using a simpler style of church music for the new order of worship in Prussia.

Brahms was also influenced by Bach and the Two Motets were published in 1878 with a dedication to the great Bach scholar, Philipp Spitta.

Warum ist das Licht gegeben? was composed during the summer of 1877, at a time when the composer was putting the finishing touches to his Second Symphony. The first performance was given in Vienna on 8 December 1878.  O Heiland, reiss die Himmel auf, in four parts, was composed earlier, between 1863 and 1864.

Rheinberger is probably the least known of the three composers and his Abendlied is likely the best known piece performed in this concert. Rheinberger was also something of a prodigy and began playing the organ and composing at the age of seven.  At 12, he was admitted to the Academy of Music in Munich where he studied with Franz Lachner, a close friend of Franz Schubert, and by the age of 15 he was gainfully employed as an organist.  He spent 33 years as professor of counterpoint and organ at the Royal School of Music in Munich where the Drei geistliche Gesänge were composed in 1855.

We hope to see you this Saturday, and please join us for a glass of wine after the concert (included in the ticket price).

Women’s World Day of Prayer Service: Friday, 1 March

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Saint Bartholomew’s is proud to host this year’s Women’s World Day of Prayer service on Friday, 1 March at 3.00pm. This service is part of a global event held annually on the first Friday in March.  The Women’s World Day of Prayer is the largest ecumenical movement in the world organised by women, and the churches in Ballsbridge/Donnybrook take turns hosting the event in our area each year.  The service for 2019 has been written by the Christian women of Slovenia and its theme is “Come—Everything is Ready!”  All parishioners—not just women!—are warmly invited to attend.  The service will be followed by refreshments in the parish room, to which everyone is welcome.  It has been five years since Saint Bartholomew’s had the honour of hosting this special event, so do please come along and show your support! 

For more information, please visit https://worlddayofprayer.net/slovenia-2019.html.

Bake Sale this Sunday

Join us after the morning Eucharist this Sunday in the parish room for a homemade baked goods sale and a book/DVD/CD sale to aid our fundraising efforts.  With Valentine’s Day upon us, there will be chocolate covered strawberries on offer, so be sure to drop in!  We greatly encourage the congregation to help with these monthly fundraisers, whether by showcasing your culinary expertise or by donating your used books, CDs, or DVDs.  These sales run on the second Sunday of the month and all proceeds go directly to the restoration fund.  Our next sale will be after the 11.00am service on Sunday, 10 March.

Encore Voices Concert: This Saturday

Saint Bartholomew’s is pleased to welcome back Encore Voices, who will perform Puccini’s Messa di Gloria this Saturday, 9 February at 7.30pm.

Led by conductor John Doyle, the singers will be accompanied by a quartet and Maria Geheran on piano.

Tickets cost €15 (student/OAP/unwaged €10; child €5) and may be purchased at the door.